Real estate
Real estate

Popular Architecture: Tudor

One style of architecture you can find no matter where you are in the UK is the Tudor style. The Tudor period lasted from 1485 to 1603, and certainly left a mark not only on the country as a whole, but also the style of buildings - which are still relatively prominent to this day. Because of this, it's easy to see just how popular this style of architecture and fascia style really is. The defining features of Tudor style housing is what we'll be talking about, so if you're interested, keep on reading!


One style of architecture you can find no matter where you are in the UK is the Tudor style. The Tudor period lasted from 1485 to 1603, and certainly left a mark not only on the country as a whole, but also the style of buildings – which are still relatively prominent to this day. Because of this, it’s easy to see just how popular this style of architecture and fascia style really is. The defining features of Tudor style housing is what we’ll be talking about, so if you’re interested, keep on reading!

Popular Architecture: Tudor

The most striking thing about the Tudor architecture that remains today is the style of the buildings on the outside, being characteristically black and white, with very obvious beaming. One thing to look out for, however, is whether these buildings are entirely genuine. Many buildings have been created in the Tudor style during resurgence periods in the past, such as this pub, built in Pitsea, Essex in the 1920s:

An example of a replica Tudor building in Pitsea, Essex. Built in the 1920s. (IMAGE CREDIT: https://scarletstandard.files.wordpress.com)

An example of a replica Tudor building in Pitsea, Essex. Built in the 1920s. (IMAGE CREDIT: https://scarletstandard.files.wordpress.com)

While the building has a similar style to genuine Tudor buildings, it is in fact a much later recreation.

This is an example of a genuine Tudor building, Mary Arden’s house.

Mary Arden's House, a genuine Tudor building. (IMAGE CREDIT: https://aipetcher.files.wordpress.com)

Mary Arden’s House, a genuine Tudor building. (IMAGE CREDIT: https://aipetcher.files.wordpress.com)

What was so special about these buildings?

The decrease in popularity in the church during and following the reign of Henry VIII resulted in people keeping their money for themselves, rather than donating it to the Church. This resulted in the creation of a new, richer, class – the Gentry. The Gentry spent more money building houses for themselves which, although smaller than those that had been built in the Gothic period, were much more detailed. These houses were very much like the ones you see above. The houses had a wooden frame which did the bulk of the structural work, and were filled in with brick (a luxurious commodity back in those days).

The beams you can see on the outside of the houses, as well as the windows and doors, were largely decorative features. It’s these features that we remember today, making the houses as popular as they are. While the decorative aspect of these properties is appealing to use due to aesthetics, they’re highly symbolic of the movements of the time, with the decreasing popularity of the Church, and the emergence of a new class of people who had a new-found freedom.

Real Estate, redefined

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Charlotte is the content creator for Domobase, a freelance content marketer and creative fiction writer. When not scribbling away, she can usually be found with her nose in a book.